Bison Pumps Water Stand is Best Water Feature For Landscape Architecture

The Bison Water Stand is a unique and functional water feature for your landscaping. With the timeless look of a hand well pump, it functions as a hydrant and connects to your city water line. Lift the handle to begin the water flow, then lower the handle for shut-off. The spout features a threaded hose bibb, allowing for easy connection of a garden hose for watering plants or rinsing off the patio.

bison pumps Water Stand
bison pumps Water Stand

The Bison Water Stand is freeze-proof, made in the USA out of hand-polished stainless steel and comes with a lifetime warranty.



Pakistan Water Crisis – H2O Wheel

The aim of this video is to create awareness about the current water crisis in Pakistan and how it affects the lives of poor people, specially women and children. aims to alleviate pain and misery from the lives of thousands of women and children who have to walk over long distances to carry water by providing them with H2O Wheels.


Doomsday Preppers episode 1

Doomsday Preppers explores the lives of otherwise ordinary Americans who are preparing for the end of the world as we know it. Unique in their beliefs, motivations, and strategies, preppers will go to whatever lengths they can to make sure they are prepared for any of life’s uncertainties. And this season, the preppers are testing the limits of ingenuity as they develop extreme doomsday survival machines, high-tech shelters, and specialized escape routes. With customized features, super-secret locations, and home-spun engineering, these extreme Armageddon defense systems are ready for anything.



Congress Considering Reforms to Safe Drinking Water Act

The National Groundwater Association recently reported on testimony heard by the Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Energy and Environment. The testimony involved possible reforms to the Safe Drinking Water Act. While many players were allowed the opportunity to present their perspective on the issue, all agreed that an increased budget of the state revolving funds is highly needed.

Rural communities, who often rely on groundwater for their drinking water, specifically outlined the difficulties in obtaining funding, getting technical assistance and treatment contamination. Usually it is more cost effective for rural communities to use groundwater than to have city water lines ran out to their community. However, the cost of drilling a well can be significant. Testing and maintaining the quality of the water is the responsibility of the individual using the well. Further, if there is a loss of electricity, there is also a loss of pressurized water. An essential component to each well, then, is a Bison Hand Pump.

The Bison Pump is hand operated and can be installed alongside or in-line with an electric submersible pump. That way, if the power goes out, you can easily switch to hand power. The Bison Pump can be used to pump water uphill or pressurize a tank. For rural communities with unreliable electricity, the Bison Hand Pump is a must-have!

For these reasons and others, the National Groundwater Association is focused on the drinking water requirements of rural communities. Bison Pumps especially supported this by attending the 2017 Groundwater Fly-In hosted by the NGWA in March. Arkansas Senator and groundwater advocate Sen. John Boozman re-affirmed his support of the NGWA and the Safe Drinking Water Act. We especially grateful for his continued support and influence.


Beyond Scarcity: Power, Poverty and the Global Water Crisis

Throughout history water has confronted humanity with some of its greatest challenges. Water is a source of life and a natural resource that sustains our environments and supports livelihoods but it is also a source of risk and vulnerability. In the early 21st Century, prospects for human development are threatened by a deepening global water crisis. Debunking the myth that the crisis is the result of scarcity, this report argues poverty, power and inequality are at the heart of the problem.

In a world of unprecedented wealth, almost 2 million children die each year for want of a glass of clean water and adequate sanitation. Millions of women and young girls are forced to spend hours collecting and carrying water, restricting their opportunities and their choices. And water-borne infectious diseases are holding back poverty reduction and economic growth in some of the worlds poorest countries.

Beyond the household, competition for water as a productive resource is intensifying. Symptoms of that competition include the collapse of water-based ecological systems, declining river flows and large-scale groundwater depletion. Conflicts over water are intensifying within countries, with the rural poor losing out. The potential for tensions between countries is also growing, though there are large potential human development gains from increased cooperation.